We turn lives around

2015 Conference Agenda

Pre - Conference, Wednesday, 9/16

DePelchin Children's Center | 4950 Memorial Dr. | Houston, TX 77007

9:00a - 4:00p

Advanced session on Integrative Treatment of Complex Trauma for Adolescents (ITCT-A)
Cheryl Lanktree, Ph.D.
Co-developer, ITCT-A and Clinical Associate Professor for the Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Southern California

ITCT-A is an evidence-based treatment that was developed to assist clinicians in the evaluation and treatment of adolescents who have experienced multiple forms of psychological trauma, often in the context of negative living conditions such as poverty, deprivation and social discrimination. The core components of ITCT-A include: Assessment driven treatment; attention to complex trauma issues; use of multiple treatment modalities; relational processing of early attachment schema and current interpersonal expectations; skills development; therapeutic exposure and exploration of trauma and advocacy and interventions at the system level.

Conference, Thursday, 9/17

The Westin Houston, Memorial City | 945 Gessner Rd. | Houston, TX 77024

8:30a – 9:15a Registration/ Breakfast/ Welcome & Introduction

 

Keynote

9:15a – 10:15a (1 CE/PD hour)

“Responding Acutely to Children Exposed to Trauma”
Melissa Brymer, Ph.D.
Director of the Terrorism and Disaster Programs at UCLA-Duke National Center for Child Traumatic Stress

Breakout Sessions

10:30a – 12:00p (1.5 CE/PD hours)

“Trauma Smart: Developing a Model of Integrated Trauma Intervention”
Janine Hron, M.B.A.
Chief Executive Officer at Crittenton Children’s Center in Kansas City, Missouri

The Trauma Smart® model is a promising practice developed over the last several years, intended to support communities to establish a lasting culture of health and resilience to chronic adversity. This session will address the characteristics of participating communities, elements of the Trauma Smart model, and lessons learned regarding navigation of the distinct social systems that must align for progress.

“ITCT Practical Tips”
Cheryl Lanktree, Ph.D.
Co-developer, ITCT-A and Clinical Associate Professor for the Dept of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Southern California

“Risk and Resiliency Factors for LGBTQ Youth” Pt.1
Al Killen-Harvey, LCSW
Co-founder of The Harvey Institute and Lead Trainer at the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital

The primary goal of this workshop is to explore the high degree of risk of abuse faced by gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth.  Due to a lack of information and visibility this group of adolescents faces physical, sexual and emotional abuse at home, school and in society at large.  The discussion will include an overview of the stages of sexual identity development and identification of the physical and emotional stressors experienced by this population.  There will also be an exploration of the cultural and institutional dynamics that reinforce this abuse.

“Using a Scientist-Practitioner Approach to Understand Childhood Grief: New Developments in Grief Theory, Research, and Assessment" Pt.1
Julie Kaplow, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and TAG Center Director at the UT Trauma and Grief Center for Youth
Christopher Layne, Ph.D.
Director of Education in Evidence-Based Practice & Research Psychologist, UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress

The field of bereavement, and the sub-field of childhood bereavement in particular, have lagged behind that of childhood trauma. Although posttraumatic stress and grief reactions often co-occur and can interact in ways that make the clinical course of each set of reactions more severe and persisting-(and thus more difficult to assess and treat)--few trauma clinicians have received formal training in childhood grief.  This workshop will provide an overview of how our scientist-practitioner approach is shaping our knowledge of how "normative" grief differs from "maladaptive" grief in youth. We begin by discussing strengths and limitations of the new Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder in DSM-5 and reviewing methodological limitations in the current bereavement literature that impede our ability to assess, conceptualize, and treat bereaved youth experiencing maladaptive grief reactions. We then provide an overview of our theory of grief-Multidimensional Grief Theory-and discuss how it can address a variety of limitations in our current knowledge base. We then draw upon Multidimensional Grief Theory to discuss empirical findings from our naturalistic longitudinal studies of bereaved youth, which we have organized into Bereavement and Loss Organizing Concepts for Kids,(BLOCKS). We discuss how each BLOCK serves as a "Core Concept" for understanding and working with bereaved youth and families (such as the role that traumatic circumstances of the death can play). We then present a conceptual tool (the CHECK heuristic) to guide clinical assessment and case formulation and illustrate how it can be used to apply each BLOCK to conceptualize, assess, and intervene with grieving children. We conclude with a case study that exemplifies the various dimensions of our grief theory and illustrates how the accurate identification of each grief dimension facilitates bereavement-informed case conceptualization and treatment planning.

12:00p – 1:00p Lunch

 "Trauma-Informed Care Consortium of Texas (TICC)" Overview
Seanna Crosbie, LCSW
TICC Chair & Director of Program & Trauma-Informed Services at Austin Child Guidance Center

1:00p – 2:30p (1.5 CE/PD hours)

“Risk and Resiliency Factors for LGBTQ Youth” Pt.2
Al Killen-Harvey, LCSW
Co-founder of The Harvey Institute and Lead Trainer at the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital

 

“Using a Scientist-Practitioner Approach to Understand Childhood Grief: New Developments in Grief Theory, Research, and Assessment” Pt.2
Julie Kaplow, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and TAG Center Director at the UT Trauma and Grief Center for Youth
Christopher Layne, Ph.D.
Director of Education in Evidence-Based Practice & Research Psychologist, UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress

 

“Real Life Heroes: Resiliency-focused Treatment for Children with Complex Trauma” Pt.1
Richard Kagan, Ph.D.
Author, Consultant and Former Director of Research and Consultation at the Parsons Child and Family Center

Participants will explore how creative arts activities and the metaphor of heroes can be utilized to engage children and caregivers to work in trauma-informed treatment programs.    Real Life Heroes is an evidence-supported treatment program for children with traumatic stress.   This workshop will include an introduction to Complex PTSD, ‘best practice’ components of treatment for Complex PTSD, and use of Real Life Heroes to engage hard-to-reach children and families.   Research results from the HEROES Project at Parsons Child and Family Center will be discussed including lessons learned from implementation of an integrated trauma and attachment-focused learning collaborative in child/family service as well as mental health treatment programs.

"Trauma Informed Systems Transformation Sustainability through Family and Youth Engagement and Partnership Part 2"
Candace Aylor, RN, CFP
Health Policy & Systems Consultant

2:45p – 4:15p (1.5 CE/PD hours)

“Real Life Heroes: Resiliency-focused Treatment for Children with Complex Trauma” Pt.2
Richard Kagan, Ph.D.
Author, Consultant and Former Director of Research and Consultation at the Parsons Child and Family Center

“A Trauma Informed Approach to Working with Runaway and Homeless Youth”
Daniel Ballin, LCSW
Director of Clinical Services, Covenant House California
Noah Kaplan, MSW
Residential Manager Youth Services Program, Los Angeles LGBT Center

Participants will

  • Learn about the prevalence of trauma in the homeless youth population.
  • Develop a lens for understanding and intervening with youth who suffer from the effects of complex trauma.
  • Identify the connection between early traumatic experiences and long-term physical and mental health issues.
  • Recognize the disproportionate trauma experienced by gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youth.
  • Introduced to the ARC model as an intervention with this population.

“Trauma-Informed Care for Children with Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities”
Colleen Horton, M.P.Aff.
Public Policy Officer at the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health

The mental health needs of children with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) are often overlooked or ignored. Caregivers typically attribute challenging behaviors to  the child’s disability without consideration of underlying mental health conditions including the impact of trauma. When mental illness is identified in people with IDD, finding professionals with knowledge and experience in treating and supporting them can be very difficult.  This session will explore where we are and what we need to do to better ensure the mental health and wellness of children with IDD.

“Trauma & Unaccompanied Minors”
Marisol Acosta, MEd, LPC-S
Project Director, Texas Children Recovering From Trauma Initiative

 

Conference, Friday, 9/18

 The Westin Houston, Memorial City | 945 Gessner Rd. | Houston, TX 77024

8:30a – 9:00a Registration/ Breakfast/ Networking

Breakout Sessions

9:30a – 10:30p (1.5 CE/PD hours)

“Addressing the Recovery Needs of Children after Disasters/ Mass Violence”
Janine Hron, M.B.A.
Chief Executive Officer at Crittenton Children’s Center in Kansas City, Missouri

“Poverty and Traumatic Stress: Strategies for Building Family Resilience” Pt.1
Laurel Kiser, Ph.D., M.B.A.
Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine

This presentation integrates theory and research from individual, dyadic, and family models of trauma response to describe families living in poverty who make complex adaptations to their traumatic circumstances in order to survive.  Understanding the family context and the common clinical characteristics of families' responses are critical to adequately assessing traumas impact and providing practical strategies for building family resilience.

“A Trauma Informed Approach to Working with Runaway and Homeless Youth”
Daniel Ballin, LCSW
Director of Clinical Services, Covenant House California
Noah Kaplan, MSW
Residential Manager Youth Services Program, Los Angeles LGBT Center

  • Participants will learn about the prevalence of trauma in the homeless youth population
  • Will develop a lens for understanding and intervening with youth who suffer from the effects of complex trauma.
  • Will identify the connection between early traumatic experiences and long-term physical and mental health issues.
  • Will recognize the disproportionate trauma experienced by gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youth.
  • Will be introduced to the ARC model as an intervention with this population.

10:45a – 12:15p (1.5 CE/PD hours)

“Poverty and Traumatic Stress: Strategies for Building Family Resilience” Pt.2
Laurel Kiser, Ph.D., M.B.A.
Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Creating a Trauma-Informed System
Al Killen-Harvey, LCSW
Co-founder of The Harvey Institute and Lead Trainer at the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital

Research is beginning to show a direct link between early childhood trauma and long term health and mental health consequences.  The goal of this workshop is to acquaint participants with a fundamental understanding of trauma and it’s short and long term effects.  Additionally the essential elements of a trauma informed system will be presented as a guide to addressing this issue.   The concept of “trauma reminders” will be described and case vignettes and videos will be utilized to enhance the learning process.  Self care for professionals working with traumatized clients will also be explored.  Since a trauma informed system is founded on the premise of a cohesive and integrated response, everyone is welcome to this workshop (administrators, line staff, support staff, etc.).

“Adapted Trauma Treatment for Youth with IDD” Pt.1
Brian Tallant, LPC
Program Director, Aurora Mental Health Center

In this session, research will be presented that demonstrates the extraordinarily high rates of abuse and neglect experienced by children who have intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).  Factors that contribute to this population’s vulnerability will be discussed, as well as reasons why they are less likely to spontaneously recover from traumatic stress.  Clinical symptoms of traumatic stress and characteristics of IDD will be compared and contrasted.  Cultural considerations will be discussed as well as factors that contribute to therapist’s cultural competency.  An overview of phase oriented trauma treatment will be presented, based on Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (Cohen, Mannarino & Deblinger, 2004).  Adaptations to trauma treatment, inclusion of systems and caregivers as well as therapist vicarious trauma will also be considered.    

12:15p – 1:00p Lunch

"Trauma-Informed Care Learning Community Initiative Overview"
Marisol Acosta, MEd, LCSW
Project Director, Texas Children Recovering From Trauma Initiative

1:00p – 2:30p (1.5 CE/PD hours)

“Unaccompanied Immigrant Minors: Clinical Considerations When Serving Very Young Children and Their Caregivers” Pt.1
Carmen Rosa Norona, MSW, MS.Ed., CEIS
Associate Director, The Child Witness to Violence Project
Marta Casas, LMHC, MEd
Justice Resource Institute      

Decades of social violence in Central America have forced families and an increased number of unaccompanied young children to seek safety in the USA. This workshop focuses on salient emotional and relational themes and challenges faced by young children who arrived as unaccompanied minors, and the adults caring for them, upon reunification or placement. It highlights the perspectives of the child, the caregiver and the child-caregiver relationship.

One of the hallmarks for these children is that their sense of safety is broken; immigrating as an unaccompanied minor can be considered one more layer in the continuum of traumatic experiences for many of these children. It often not only involves losses of familiar places and mores, rupture of significant relationships, but exposure to violence and danger in the absence of a protective figure. All of this can have a deleterious impact in identity, the perception of self, others, and the world.

This workshop discusses historical trauma as a framework to: 1. Gain and understanding of the reasons for displacement/forced migration; 2. Explore the relationship of historical trauma and intergenerational trauma; 3. Tailor clinical interventions with this population

This workshop is also based on the premise that the attachment system is the most parsimonious tool in the recovery from traumatic events for young children. The relationship with a family member, a parent or a foster parent can be restored, preserved, or built to help the child gain a sense of safety and meaning making of their traumatic experiences, help the caregiver reframe his/her views about the child’s behaviors and emotions and make meaning of the legacies of intergenerational and historical trauma in child-caregiver relationships..

“Adapted Trauma Treatment for Youth with IDD” Pt.2
Brian Tallant, LPC
Program Director, Aurora Mental Health Center

“Key Ethical Considerations in Promoting Vicarious Resilience in Trauma Work ” Pt.1
Sandra Lopez, LCSW, ACSW, Diplomat in Clinical Social Work
Clinical Social Worker and Consultant in Private Practice

It is common for first responders, medical personnel, child protection, law enforcement, therapists, and others to see the physical effects or to hear narratives of those who have experienced traumatic events.  Managing the impact of these images and stories can be challenging for helping professionals and may even place them at risk for developing vicarious trauma.  This presentation will explore key ethical considerations in trauma work, identify signs and symptoms of vicarious trauma, and introduce the contemporary concept of vicarious resilience.  The focus will be on developing strategies for addressing and reducing the impact of vicarious trauma and promoting resilience for individuals and organizations.

"Transference, Countertransference and the Trauma Triangle" Pt. 1
Rosalie Hyde, LCSW, LMFT
Executive Director/Clinical Director of the Houston-Galveston Trauma Institute

2:45p – 4:15p (1.5 CE/PD hours)

“Unaccompanied Immigrant Minors: Clinical Considerations When Serving Very Young Children and Their Caregivers” Pt.2
Carmen Rosa Norona, MSW, MS.Ed., CEIS
Associate Director, The Child Witness to Violence Project
Marta Casas, LMHC, MEd
Justice Resource Institute       

“Key Ethical Considerations in Promoting Vicarious Resilience in Trauma Work ” Pt.2
Sandra Lopez, LCSW, ACSW, Diplomat in Clinical Social Work
Clinical Social Worker and Consultant in Private Practice

"Transference, Countertransference and the Trauma Triangle" Pt. 2
Rosalie Hyde, LCSW, LMFT
Executive Director/Clinical Director of the Houston-Galveston Trauma Institute

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

View speaker bios here.